The Cold Truth About After Birth: Why is it harder to deal with postpartum than prenatal?

Mario Denver

Contributor

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest

Entering the world of parenting can be very daunting, and most of the time, it is not always as promising as it should be for some parents. This is the cold truth in the world of parenting a toddler, where various conflicts arise in unlooked-for situations. An indefinite number of pregnant women are experiencing prenatal anxiety and stress–which the obstetrician claimed normal. Still, if the symptoms continuously occurred for an extended period, this might lead to the deep trouble of depression. 

 

 

However, this prenatal anxiety, stress, or depression can be healed like a shot through the husband, family, friends, and especially a professional doctor. 

 

But the real deal of struggle comes from the aftermath of giving birth to a child. Postpartum stress, anxiety, or depression can be overwhelming in hand as it requires the person an extreme effort and medication to deal with this. Most of these complications during pregnancy do not only occur for mothers but also fathers. When parents are struggling emotionally after pregnancy, but only for a short period, this might be considered only as baby blues. But if the symptoms grow severed as days go by, it needs immediate assistance from the doctors, which can be deadly for both parents and children. One of the most vicious news we can hear about postpartum depression is a mother or a father who brutally killed their child for unknown reasons; heart-crushing news like this will instantly bring horrible thoughts about the parents, but seeing it in a broader psychological perspective, this can be just one of the effects of postpartum depression. 

 

 

But parenting is not always hard as it seems. Remember what happened after God formed a flood to eliminate human’s wrongdoings? Well, God put a rainbow in the sky as a promise that He would never do it again. During and after pregnancy, felt like heavy rain constantly pouring and flooding the hearts of pain and tears. But seeing the child grow delightfully is genuinely a rainbow shimmering in the sky, wiping away the remaining waters of distress inside. Children are gifts, and they will always be; they bring constant innocent wonders and happiness in the world where corrupted minds and hearts exist. In the book called, “What Does My Baby Dream Of?” written by Angela Arnephy, she tackles wonders about what a young, innocent creature thinks of every time they move a gentle gesture, shed a tear, and smile in sleep. She wrote and wholeheartedly dedicate the book in awe of her two daughters; on top of that, the book has cunning illustrations on every page, merely illustrating the wonder of being a parent. 

 

“What Does My Baby Dream Of?” is a highly recommended book for parents who just endured an overwhelming prenatal or postpartum struggles. Angela Arnephy wrote the book through warning words that a parent’s heart can understand, and this is the best book to fill your vacant time and appreciate your child beyond what can words and actions do. Truly, the struggle you experienced during and after pregnancy is nothing compared to the joy of seeing your child in peace. 

 

t

By subscribing with us, you agree to our Terms & Condition and have read our Privacy Policy. You may receive an email for our Newsletter and you can opt out any time.

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

The Universal Pages will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.